Story Cafe “Luxulyan to Newquay – an Example of Cornish Ingenuity”, Saturday 16th July

Story Cafe “Luxulyan to Newquay – an Example of Cornish Ingenuity”, Saturday 16th July

Saturday 16th July 2016 at 8.30pm Kings Arms, Luxulyan We are delighted to announce another of our very popular Story Cafes, this time focusing on Joseph Treffry who is recognised as one of the pioneers of the Industrial Revolution in Cornwall as well as many of the other engineers and scientists who contributed to Cornish Industry in the 19th Century. All are welcome!  ...
Bonfire Celebrations at Castle an Dinas

Bonfire Celebrations at Castle an Dinas

More than eighty adults and children came together on 23rd June to celebrate the Ancient Cornish Tradition of lighting a bonfire on Midsummer’s Eve.  It was hosted by St Columb Old Cornwall Society at Castle an Dinas, courtesy of Cornwall Heritage Trust.  Among the spectators were members of other Old Cornwall Societies, several Bards of the Cornish Gorsedd and trustees of Cornwall Heritage Trust. The history of the Midsummer bonfire dates back to the times of Pagan rituals.  The Church had to make a decision.  It could either suppress such Pagan Festivals or use them for its own purpose.  It decided the latter and the fires were allowed to continue and to occur on the Feast Day of John the Baptist.  The Cornish name for the Festival is ‘Golowan’ translated from Cornish as Gol(feast) and Jowan(John). There were plenty of hot pasties and cups of tea served by Sheila Neale, Rosemary Coley and Jean Smith, plus a huge bonfire at the St Columb celebration.  The Master of Ceremonies. Dave Crewes, started the event by welcoming everyone.  As is the custom, the Ceremony was spoken first in Cornish and then in English.  Following the lighting of the bonfire at 9pm, by Peter Wyper, the Lady of the Flowers, Barbara Wyper, cast her garland of flowers into the burning fire.  The garland is made up of ‘good’ and ‘bad’ herbs and tied together with ribbons of symbolic colours.  The ‘good’ herbs have medicinal properties and the ‘bad’ ones are poisonous. Then everyone gathered around the roaring fire for Community singing led by John Bennallick and aided by Mark Hawkins, playing the...
Introducing Hairy Tej at the Royal Cornwall Show 2016

Introducing Hairy Tej at the Royal Cornwall Show 2016

It was wonderful to meet so many members and new friends over the three days of the recent Royal Cornwall Show.  One of our guests was The Right Reverend Tim Thornton (Bishop of Truro) who can be seen in our photos with the Trust’s Chairman, Lt Col Philip Hills, and Vice Chairman, Mr Mike Hawkey. Our stand was well received and we were thrilled to meet lots of younger visitors who were hot on the trail of scarecrows!  The Show runs a scarecrow trail every year and this year we joined in the fun with a depiction of our new Iron Age character, Hairy Tej!  Hairy Tej will be helping out with children’s activities and events so watch this space for more news of him!        ...
The Guizer’s Tale

The Guizer’s Tale

The latest Cornish Story Café was held in the King’s Arms, Luxulyan on 26 May. An audience of nearly forty was treated to an excellent evening of storytelling, music and acting from Merv Davey and his wife Alison. The theme of the evening followed the story of Cornish Guizing from its roots in the mystery plays to the present day with Pybaplus as a “special guest”. Guizer, Geeze Dancer or Goosey Dancer is a delightful dialect term that has its roots in both Cornish and English but has come to mean a folk custom involving a mixture of stories, drama, songs, dance and a certain element of misrule. Its Cornish origin is from the word “geys”, that means mockery, a jest or indeed a custom  and in English of course it has connotations of disguise. The Cornish Geeze Dancers may well be able to trace their lineage to the Cornish Mystery plays indeed the last few lines of Gwreans an Bys transcribed in 1611  announce: Minstrels growgh dhyn ny pyba May hallan warbarthe downssya Del ew an vaner ha’n geys Minstrels, pipe for us That we may together dance As is the manner and the guise   Merv and Alison performed the story with a range of traditional Cornish instruments that included the pipes and harp with a final appearance of the “special guest”! The evening was rounded off by questions from the floor and traditional Cornish music led by Merv and...