Bohemian Crantock Story Cafe

Bohemian Crantock Story Cafe

On Wednesday 25th March, another excellent Story Café took place in Crantock. The Cosy Nook Tea Rooms was packed with interested people eager to listen to Ben Dobson’s talk on Bohemian Crantock. Ben’s unique style of presenting a story had the audience fully engaged from the start – with many facts on how the village developed from a primarily farming area a tourist haven, the people who lived here and the factors which shaped the area. The GWR began to promote Newquay as a holiday destination because the revenue from transporting ore and china clay had declined significantly as Par docks expanded. However, Crantock remained isolated as the road from Newquay was tortuous and went through Treloggan before descending to Trevemper and thence on to Crantock.  It was not until 1926 that the Gannel road was built that shortened the journey. This was a major development and was accompanied by the building of a new bridge at Trevemper.  In 1939, an order was finally approved by Cornwall Quarter sessions at Bodmin, granting Cornwall County Council permission to close the old bridge. Three years after the Gannel road was opened, the telephone network was extended from Newquay to Crantock and West Pentire and in May 1935, new power cables were approved for installation along the same route. Crantock’s isolation was coming to an end! It was interesting to learn about the events which took place in the village – the Gannel Regatta, the Tea Treats, Crantock Band and the people who had stayed in the village over the years – using it a base for writing, composing, painting and drawing...

Cornish Story Cafe – Celebrate Picrous

For this event the ICS, Cornwall Heritage Trust and Storylines are combining forces with the Kings Arms at Luxulyan to mark the annual Picrous celebrations by holding a Cornish Story Café. Bob Keys, the President of the Cornish Audio Visual Archive, will be speaking about the Picrous story and how it can be understood in relation to local heritage and folklore. There will also be music and storytelling (if you would like to join in the music and storytelling you are very welcome). It is open to all and there is no charge but we would be grateful you could inform us if you are interested in coming since there will be refreshments.  For more details or to book your place please...
Cornish Story Cafe – The Strange Disappearance of Jane Trinidade

Cornish Story Cafe – The Strange Disappearance of Jane Trinidade

In 1822 Jane Trinidade (neé Johns) and her husband José disappeared from Cornwall.  Jane did not reappear again until 1841. Come and hear her story and bring any research that you have done into this remarkable lady as Cornwall Heritage Trust hosts another of its popular Cornish Story Cafes. There may even be some singing afterwards!   Cornish Story Café (Whethlow Kernow)  Being held at The Cornishman in Crantock at 6pm on Monday 12th October – all are very welcome to come along and be entertained! For more information please contact...
Cornish Story Cafe in Looe

Cornish Story Cafe in Looe

Cornwall Heritage Trust was pleased to sponsor the first Cornish Story Cafe in Looe.  Locals and visitors alike were treated to a story about a Cornish fisherman from Newlyn and his adventures through Canada and USA in 1911.  The venue overlooked the harbour at the newly refurbished Portbyhan Hotel and this was a chance for people with an interest in local history to come together in an informal and friendly atmosphere. The situation of the café couldn’t have been better with fabulous views of the beautiful old luggers that had just arrived for this years regatta. The event was organized by Cornwall Heritage Trust in conjunction with Cornish Memory and Looe Old Cornwall Society. People were able to relax with food and a glass of wine to hear a story about the Newlyn fishing riots of 1896 and Cornishman William Guy’s adventures across Canada and USA to the Californian gold mines in 1911. Lamorna Spry told the story which was based on extracts from William’s diary.  Artefacts from his journey included a leather money belt which showed just how thin he was! People were also able to browse through old photographs of Looe provided by Azook’s Cornish Memory project. Miner Quay, the Looe shanty group, finished off by entertaining everyone with music that traced William’s journey from the ‘Leaving of Liverpool’ to ‘Far from Home’. Everyone was keen to have another repeat event and Cornwall Heritage Trust is now planning a series of Story Cafes around Cornwall as it certainly seems to be a popular...