News from Cornwall Heritage Trust

Treffry Viaduct closed for survey work

Please note that the Treffry Viaduct will be closed for survey work (trial trenching and the lifting of granite sleepers) starting on Monday 3rd April.  It is likely to be closed for at least a week and we apologise for any inconvenience caused.  This work is part of the preparation for the restoration project and is therefore essential.... read more

Bohemian Crantock Story Cafe

On Wednesday 25th March, another excellent Story Café took place in Crantock. The Cosy Nook Tea Rooms was packed with interested people eager to listen to Ben Dobson’s talk on Bohemian Crantock. Ben’s unique style of presenting a story had the audience fully engaged from the start – with many facts on how the village developed from a primarily farming area a tourist haven, the people who lived here and the factors which shaped the area. The GWR began to promote Newquay as a holiday destination because the revenue from transporting ore and china clay had declined significantly as Par docks expanded. However, Crantock remained isolated as the road from Newquay was tortuous and went through Treloggan before descending to Trevemper and thence on to Crantock.  It was not until 1926 that the Gannel road was built that shortened the journey. This was a major development and was accompanied by the building of a new bridge at Trevemper.  In 1939, an order was finally approved by Cornwall Quarter sessions at Bodmin, granting Cornwall County Council permission to close the old bridge. Three years after the Gannel road was opened, the telephone network was extended from Newquay to Crantock and West Pentire and in May 1935, new power cables were approved for installation along the same route. Crantock’s isolation was coming to an end! It was interesting to learn about the events which took place in the village – the Gannel Regatta, the Tea Treats, Crantock Band and the people who had stayed in the village over the years – using it a base for writing, composing, painting and drawing... read more

Trust receives bequest in honour of its work with Cornish heritage

Susan Irene Pellowe Trust Susan Irene Pellowe, passed away on July 16, 2012 after a valiant fight against ALS (a form of Motor Neurone Disease). She was born in Detroit, Michigan on November 10th 1939 to Lila Irene Cook Pellowe and William Charles Smithson Pellowe. William was a Cornishman by birth and a Methodist Minister and it was from him that Susan inherited her keen interest in Cornwall and the life and work of John and Susanna Wesley.  Susan was named after Susanna Wesley. A performer, writer, theatre director and educator, Susan toured the USA, Canada, and Britain with her solo enactment of the Mother of Methodism, “O Susanna!”. In 1997 she was honoured with an award from the Westminster Experiment and Research in Evangelism Trust in London for her “outstanding contribution to promoting our traditions and letting people know the message that is at the very heart of Methodism.” Named a Bard of the Cornish Gorsedh in 1996 for her services in preserving and furthering Cornish culture Susan visited Cornwall often. She was also co-founder of the Illinois Cornish Society and a member of the board of Celtic Women International. The Trustees of Cornwall Heritage Trust were delighted to receive a bequest of over £12,000 from Susan and will endeavour to use the money in a manner of which she would approve. Donations, bequests and membership subscriptions are vital to the Trust to enable it to carry on its work with the various sites around Cornwall as well as providing grants to organisations, educational projects and so much more. Thank you Susan for remembering Cornwall Heritage... read more

The Legend of Dupath Well – rewritten!

What a wonderful film to showcase the work undertaken by Storylines as part of the “Landmark Travels – Our past in a suitcase” project, which was funded by Cornwall Heritage Trust and the Heritage Lottery Fund.  Many thanks to the children of Pensilva and Calstock Primary Schools who helped to tell the... read more

HRH Prince of Wales, Duke of Cornwall renews his Patronage of CHT for a further 5 years

The President, Chairman and Trustees of Cornwall Heritage Trust are delighted to announce that HRH The Prince of Wales, Duke of Cornwall has agreed to extend his Patronage of the Cornwall Heritage Trust for a further five years from January 2017. This is a great honour for the Trust and provides encouragement to all within the Trust to carry on their aim of preserving and strengthening Cornwall’s unique heritage. Having celebrated its 30th anniversary last year the Trust is busier than ever. It owns four properties of its own and manages a further seven historic sites in Cornwall on behalf of English Heritage, all of which are free to visit all year round. The Trust has been working in partnership with Cornwall Council on the Luxulyan Valley Heritage Restoration project, which received earmarked funding of £3.4m from the Heritage Lottery Fund in November 2015. This project will enable important restoration works to the Treffry Viaduct, an iconic monument owned by Cornwall Heritage Trust.   The grants scheme offered by the Trust enables organisations and individuals to further its work in preserving Cornwall’s heritage and promoting the knowledge of Cornwall’s rich past. This work is also reflected in the education programme where Schools Transport Grants enable Primary Schools to take the children on trips to experience their Cornish heritage first hand. This renewed Patronage by His Royal Highness underlines the importance of the work done by the Trust and acknowledges the difference made by the promotion of Cornwall’s heritage. Lt Col Philip Hills, Chairman of the Trust commented: “This is a very exciting time for the Trust and we are... read more

Story Cafe – Bohemian Crantock 1920 – 1950

Another of our wonderful Story Cafes, this time focusing on Bohemian Crantock – 1920 – 1950.   Please come along to Cosy Nook Tea Room on Wednesday 15th March at 6.30pm to hear the talk by Ben Dobson, Institute of Cornish Studies Associate... read more

Trust acquires Trethevy Field

At the beginning of November the Trust were informed that the field in which Trethevy Quoit is located was for sale.  While the quoit itself was gifted to the Government in the 1930s, the field was in separate ownership and a potential buyer was keen to use it for grazing horses.  The Trust was most concerned about this as some years ago there had been many problems with the public accessing the quoit because of grazing horses. In consultation with the Government Agencies, Historic England and English Heritage, it was decided that Cornwall Heritage Trust should bid to acquire the field thus protecting this magnificent monument.  The Trust are indebted to David Attwell, the Trustee that manages the East Cornwall sites, who successfully negotiated the purchase as well as a grant from Historic England to help pay for the land. If you would like to learn more about Trethevy Quoit, a monument managed by the Trust for English Heritage, click here... read more

CHT chosen to be a Waitrose “Community Matters Pillar” for March!

Cornwall Heritage Trust was delighted to learn that it has been chosen as a Waitrose “Community Matters Pillar” in the new Truro store for March 2017. How can you help?  Well, at the end of your shop in the store, you’ll receive a token to place in the box of the good cause you’d most like to support. The more tokens a cause gets, the bigger the donation they receive. Each month every Waitrose branch donates £1,000 between 3 local good causes and in March Cornwall Heritage Trust will be one of those good causes! Every penny raised will go towards furthering the work the Trust undertakes to preserve and strengthen Cornwall’s unique heritage; this may be through the grant scheme, school transport grants or perhaps the ongoing work carried out at each of the 11 sites managed by the Trust throughout Cornwall. If you are planning a visit to the Waitrose store in Truro please consider using your token to help Cornwall Heritage Trust carry out its amazing work in... read more

Cornwall For Ever Website Launched!

It’s not every day that HRH Prince of Wales, Dolly Pentreath, Kernow King and Richard Trevithick are involved with the launch of a new website, however this is exactly what happened last Friday at Truro College when the new Cornwall For Ever (Kernow Bys Vyken) website was launched.   The project to digitize the Millennium book and create a unique website for Cornwall was celebrated with a launch event held at Truro College and hosted by Cornwall Heritage Trust. Col Edward Bolitho, Lord Lieutenant of Cornwall and President of Cornwall Heritage Trust read out a message from HRH Prince of Wales (Patron of CHT) in which he congratulated all those involved on the new website and reflected on the changes Cornwall has seen since the book was published in 2000.   Those present were then treated to a performance by Ed Rowe (Kernow King) in which he entwined elements of his critically acclaimed play “Trevithick!” with appearances by some of Cornwall’s historic figures; which included Dolly Pentreath, John Couch-Adams and Humphry Davy as well as Richard Trevithick of course!   Mr Michael Galsworthy (Chairman of the Steering Group) introduced the project to the invited guests, who included pupils of Richard Lander, Newquay Tretherras and Gwinear Schools, and explained that the project was the culmination of four years of work. The website was then launched by Tristan, a pupil from Gwinear School, and officially handed over to the children of Cornwall as a free resource.   The children were all delighted to meet Cornish sporting heroes Ed Coode, Jack Galsworthy and Tassy Swallow who, along with Ed Rowe, presented them... read more

Treffry Viaduct and Luxulyan Valley – A riot of autumnal colours

Trust Administrator, Cathy Woolcock, and her family visited Luxulyan Valley and Treffry Viaduct for the first time this weekend and here’s what she thought: “I hang my head in shame that I have worked for the Trust for over a year now and have only just made my first trip to see Treffry Viaduct however it was definitely worth the wait!  The colours of the trees and hedgerows in the valley are truly spectacular at the moment, ranging from lincoln green to vivid scarlett and every shade in between; Mother Nature is truly putting on a fantastic autumnal show this year.  We all enjoyed trying to catch falling leaves as the wind whipped them just out of our grasp like confetti in the breeze.  Shuffling through the deep carpet of crispy leaves we made our way to the top of the viaduct itself and the children were fascinated to hear how the water had passed over the aqueduct to power the waterwheel and how it is hoped water will once again flow across – they couldn’t resist peeping through the gaps to see if they could spot any drops of water! The view from the top is breathtaking and what a treat to be able to walk across!  We were delighted to spot the tram lines and sluice gates and appreciate the wonderful view before we headed back down the paths to enjoy the full splendour of the viaduct by standing underneath it!  This was a really great place to bring the family (Alfie the spaniel too!) and it was FREE!!  We didn’t have enough time to properly explore however another visit... read more

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