The Gibson Photographic Archive

The Gibson Photographic Archive

With the help of a grant from Cornwall Heritage Trust the Penlee House Gallery was able to purchase at auction the Gibson Family Photographic Archive. The archive connects three important strands of Penlee House Gallery & Museum’s activity: archaeology, local history and art. The Gibson photographs of Penzance and its surrounding area, including construction, fishing and mining, support and illuminate the museum artefacts by creating a visual context for interpretation and education. Gibsons was a thriving Scilly and Penzance business: the range of subjects in this collection reflect its commercial interests, which include depictions of Cornish scenes with the potential for a wider, national appeal. Whilst three quarters of the collection are west Cornwall images, the remainder are an indication of the breadth of Gibson & Sons interests e.g. Tintagel Castle and nearby Bossiney, Camelford, Bude, Tintern Abbey and Stonehenge. Seen as a whole, the collection shows the preoccupations, not to mention ambition, of this early photography business, just as the new railway was bringing masses of tourists to Cornwall. Gibson Penzance’s dates (1877 – 1925) coincide with the development of the Newlyn artists’ colony. Penlee will use the archive to research the links between photography and the art community in Penzance and Newlyn, in particular the artists of the Newlyn School   More Grants Dark Skies Grants Grylls Monument Restoration Grants Sensory Trust – Launch of Sensory Guides, King Edward Mine event Grants Out of the Archive Grants Penzance Jewish Cemetery Grants Morrab Library – Opie Collection Grants Next Entries...
St Buryan Cross

St Buryan Cross

During 2016 St Buryan Church PCC, Cornwall Archaeological Unit, Scott & Co. Chartered Surveyors and local builders Bolithos together undertook works to restore the imposing stepped medieval cross in the churchyard of St Buryan Parish Church.  This also presented the opportunity for some archaeological exploration of how and when this complex monument was formed and to see whether the granite slabs set as the steps include any pieces of early sculpture in addition to the cross-head. The St Buryan Churchyard cross sits at the heart of an ancient, vibrant community and is a much-loved focus of village life, clambered over by the young and used as a backdrop for many of life’s landmarks, such as weddings. This project has enabled us to stabilise and preserve it for future generations. The work was made possible by grants from Cornwall Heritage Trust and Historic England’s Heritage at Risk fund. St Buryan has played a key role in the history of West Penwith and of Cornwall.  In the 10th century, when the core of the cross may have been erected, it was the focus of patronage by King Athelstan, grandson of Alfred the Great who led resistance against the Vikings, who visited and subsequently endowed St Buryan’s church in around 931.  Previously, it was the site of a 6th-century Celtic monastery founded by an Irishwoman, St Buriana, and there are archaeological clues that this may have used an earlier Romano-Celtic courtyard settlement (like Chysauster and Carn Euny) – a type of settlement peculiar to West Penwith and which is redolent of contacts between Iron Age Cornwall and the Roman world. This was...
Liskeard Unlocked

Liskeard Unlocked

How a grant from Cornwall Heritage Trust helped celebrate Liskeard’s heritage buildings As part of the national Heritage Open Days in September, a group of organisations in Liskeard worked together to host Liskeard Unlocked. This was a total of 20 events designed to celebrate Liskeard’s heritage in different ways, and included the opening of buildings not usually accessible by the public, heritage and geological walks around our heritage buildings within the town, skills demonstrations such as bell ringing, talks, family activities, exhibitions and artists workshops. With the assistance of grants from Cornwall Heritage Trust and Cornwall Community Chest three artists workshops were held. The call to local artists asked them to help celebrate Liskeard’s heritage buildings and look at them in new ways. We asked artists to design a workshop and explain how it fitted the theme. Local artist Carol Whibley ran ‘Behind Closed Doors’, making hinged doorways from recycled cardboard, then using collage and mixed media to create what would be found inside – this was both literal and abstract. Another local artist Nicky Harwood ran a family ‘White-line printing’ workshop. This worked from photographs of local buildings, cropping them to find interesting shapes and then using this to create a printing plate. This workshop was repeated at the end of the Liskeard Unlocked weekend, allowing people to use the photographs they had taken while visiting properties for their inspiration. During Liskeard Unlocked we also staged an exhibition of the work created so far. People enjoyed identifying where the images in the exhibition were taken from, and found that things they walked past everyday they had not really...
The Rhoda Mary Project

The Rhoda Mary Project

Rhoda Mary Project to undertake a Memory Day, make 4 films to record memories relating to Merchant Schooners and more specifically related to the Rhoda Mary, built in Devoran in 1868 and then produce a pilot school workshop, all in conjunction with Storylines. We have recently completed the final part of the work which was to run the workshop with year 6 pupils at Devoran School. This was all very well received. please see below a link to a blog post by Storylines to illustrate what we have achieved with your help.   With very many thanks for your support, Anna Brunyee, Chair Rhoda Mary Project Devoran School get to know Rhoda Mary More Grants Dark Skies Grants Grylls Monument Restoration Grants Sensory Trust – Launch of Sensory Guides, King Edward Mine event Grants Out of the Archive Grants Penzance Jewish Cemetery Grants Morrab Library – Opie Collection Grants Next Entries...
Coastguard’s Daughter

Coastguard’s Daughter

The Coastguard’s Daughter “A compelling and beautiful piece of theatre” ***** The Cornish Guardian The Coastguard’s Daughter is a piece of original, lyrical theatre and storytelling, interweaved with live shanty singing and hymns of the sea. A true story inspired this production about the bravery, spirit and musical soul of a community living by the push and pull of the tide. Performed with the Shanty group The Press Gang in the very home of the story, this project culminated is three sold out performances at Pentewan church in April 2016. An almost lost and forgotten Cornish tale. In 1915 the Head Coastguard of one maritime village and his crew, left their posts in order to enlist in the First World War. It was the Coastguard’s wife and two teenager daughters who volunteered and took up his mantle. Undertaking the responsibility of the perilous post and the long watch, looking out over the boats and the bay, staying strong and lighting the way. Poetic and playful, the unique production celebrates and laments what it is to live by the laws of the sea. The roles and rhythms of both a community at war and working to the beat and sway of the changing tides. Working with a local community choir blends and adds their own voices to the story. Singing the song of the unsung heroes and the ballads boys and girls gone by, whilst connecting intrinsically to the people and place to which it is performed. A community workshop lead by the Director and the Writer collects and weaves community stories into the fabric of the piece. Director: Rosanna...