Cornwall Heritage Trust’s Sites… 11 good reasons to join us !

Cornwall Heritage Trust owns or manages 11 sites spanning the breadth of Cornwall from Sancreed Beacon in the far west, to Dupath Well in the east. Our sites also cover a broad spectrum of history, from Neolithic remains such as Tregiffian Burial Chamber near Penzance to the 19th Century Treffry Viaduct near Luxulyan.

Take a look at our sites below and we hope you will agree how important it is to protect these precious glimpses into our past. If you join the Trust, your money will be used to help conserve our Cornish Heritage for future generations – and you get FREE ENTRY into English Heritage sites in Cornwall.

Sites Owned By Us


Trevanion Culverhouse

Trevanion Culverhouse

This well preserved 13th to 14th century dovecote, with its keystone finish roof, is thought to be the only one, of four surviving examples of its kind, in Cornwall. The Culverhouse was used to farm the eggs and meat of its inhabitants.

Castle an Dinas

Castle an Dinas

This magnificent iron age Celtic fort dates from about the second or third century B.C. It consists of three concentric circles, of ditch and rampart, 850 feet in diameter and standing 700 feet above sea level.

Sancreed Beacon

Sancreed Beacon

This beautiful stretch of natural moorland offers both a spectacular view across Mounts Bay and a wide variety of flora, fauna and historical remains.

treffry viaduct

Treffry Viaduct

Built between 1839 and 1842 by its owner Joseph Thomas Treffry, this viaduct, 90 feet high and 670 feet long, had the dual purpose of carrying both a tramway and a high level leat across the beautiful Luxulyan Valley.

Sites We Protect


Dupath Well

Dupath Well

A still almost complete and charming c.1500 granite-built Well House set over a Holy Well. This little baptistry and oratory contains the remains of a simple bath for the purpose of immersion.

The Hurler Stone Circles

The Hurler Stone Circles

Within a host of prehistoric remains on Bodmin Moor, this line of three early Bronze Age stone circles is one of the best examples of ceremonial standing stones in the south-west and is associated with many Cornish legends.

Tregiffian Burial Chamber

Tregiffian Burial Chamber

This superb example of a Neolithic or early Bronze Age Entrance Grave was probably built sometime between 2000 to 3000 BC. It is located by the roadside on a grass verge near Merry Maidens Stone Circle, which is known as ‘Dans Macn’, or the stone dance.

St Breock Downs Monolith

St Breock Downs Monolith

This Menhir or prehistoric Longstone, which was originally about 16 feet high, was known as Men Gurta. It is now more correctly called St Breock Longstone. Weighing about 16.5 tons it is still the heaviest standing stone in Cornwall.

King Doniert’s Stone

King Doniert’s Stone

Two finely worked stone pieces of a 9th century cross or crosses, believed to commemorate Dungarth, King of Cornwall, who was tragically drowned c.875 AD.

Trethevy Quoit

Trethevy Quoit

This is perhaps the best preserved Portal Dolmen in Cornwall and one of the most impressive in Britain. This chamber tomb is dated from the Neolithic or late stone age, and may have been built sometime in about 3500 BC.

Carn Euny

Carn Euny

Lying on the south west slope of Caer Brane, this courtyard house settlement of the Iron Age and Romano-British periods was occupied from about 500 BC to AD 400; especially noted for its well-preserved souterrain or fogou.


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